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Amethyst - but in red!

Hydrangea macrophylla Red Amethyst™

Fuchsia-red blooms, with hints of lime-green. Strong stems and dark-green leaves provide structure for the ever-changing, hard blooms, which darken to vintage colors of red and green.

You’re going to love the amazing color combination and long-lasting flowers of Red Amethyst! Fuchsia-red blooms, with hints of lime green will energize and refresh your garden space with their bright, display of color. An ideal selection for gifting, Red Amethyst is a Hydrangea that keeps on giving. Strong stems and dark-green leaves provide structure for the ever-changing, hard blooms, which darken to vintage colors of red and green as they mature. Enjoy in a container or plant in a favorite outdoor space, but don’t forget to harvest a few stems for your indoor arrangements – if treated well, blooms can last a month or more in a vase! With so many uses for Red Amethyst…you just might need more than one! Pruning: Prune to shape by taking the dead stems before plant leaves out in spring Apply 3-6” of organic mulch after pruning.

Please note: We don't sell plants. Asking your local retailer or googling the plant name is the easiest way to find someone selling our plants.

Please note: Download hi-res photos from the photo gallery at the bottom of the page.


Who Am I?

  • Common Name

    Red Amethyst hydrangea
  • Botanical Name

    Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Hokomareda’ PPAF
  • Type

    Shrub
  • Bloom Time

    Summer on old and new wood
  • Bloom Color

    Red or purple

Cultural Details

  • Bloom Time

    Summer on old and new wood
  • Size

    3-4' tall by 3-4' wide
  • Hardiness Zone

    6-9
  • Light

    Part sun-prefers afternoon shade
  • Soil

    Average garden soil
  • Moisture

    Moist, well-drained
  • Disease & Pests

    None known
  • Landscape Use

    Garden paths, gift plants, urban gardens
  • Propagation

    Cuttings
  • Pruning

    If you live in the North: Cut off any dead wood in late May, after the leaves have started to unfurl. If you live in the South: Should you see any dead wood, prune it back to live wood in early spring, after the leaves have started to unfurl.

Available Photos

Hover over images to download hi-res files.